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Energy Storage in North Carolina: Where Are We Now?
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Energy Storage in North Carolina: Where Are We Now?

4/25/2016
When: Monday, April 25, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Where: Charlotte Convention Center, ROOM 207CD
501 S College Street
Charlotte, North Carolina  28202
United States
Presenter: NC Sustainable Energy Association & Energy Storage Association
Contact: Diane Cherry
919-832-7601 ext. 108

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Energy Storage in NC: Where Are We Now?  

This workshop will review the status of North Carolina’s strong and growing energy storage cluster.  Energy storage is beginning to penetrate the North Carolina market and the cluster has grown in both revenue and employment. 

Workshop participants will hear from the NC Sustainable Energy Association (NCSEA) on the the most frequently mentioned recommendations for overcoming barriers to battery integration and where North Carolina stands on the identified key barriers and recommendations.  Following the NCSEA presentation, attendees will learn about the energy storage economic development opportunities in the state.  Alevo Energy’s decision to put its GridBank manufacturing plant in Concord has focused attention in North Carolina on battery storage. But for years, North Carolina has already been building a vendor, research and manufacturing chain for the industry that runs literally from the ground up.  The American Jobs Project recently published a report that shows North Carolina has the makings of a utility-scale battery-storage industry.

Workshop participants will learn about Duke Energy’s storage pilot projects across the country.  These include a lead acid battery in the ERCOT region, solar lithium battery storage unit in Carmel, IN and a microgrid project at McAlpine Energy Storage System in Charlotte, NC, to name a few.  Finally, the workshop will conclude with a presentation on the research undertaken at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte on the current effectiveness of different battery storage technologies.  Download the one page handout and agenda here. 

Agenda

 1:00 – 1:10 P.M.                            Welcome & Overview of the Workshop

Diane Cherry, Strategic Director, NC Sustainable Energy Association

             

·       Goals of the Workshop

·       Agenda Overview

 

1:10 – 1:30 P.M.                            State of Energy Storage in North Carolina

Peter Ledford, Regulatory Counsel, NC Sustainable Energy Association

 

·       Overview of NCSEA’s Batteries Not Included, a publication about the state of energy storage in North Carolina

·       Historical context for energy storage in NC and current barriers to energy storage deployment      

·       Participant Q&A

 

1:30 – 1:50 P.M.                            Economic Development Opportunities with Utility-Scale Battery Technology

Kate Ringness, Program Manager, American Jobs Project, University of California at Berkeley

 

This session will present the economic development roadmap the American Jobs

Project constructed to grow North Carolina’s utility scale energy storage sector.


1:50 - 2:05 P.M.                             Break

 

2:05 – 2:30 P.M.                            Energy Storage Pilot Projects: What Has Duke Energy Learned?

Zachary Kuznar, CHP, Energy Storage & Microgrid Development, Duke Energy &

Mike Rowand, Director, Technology Development, Duke Energy

 

This presentation will highlight the energy storage pilot projects Duke Energy has undertaken across the country.  The pilots include a lead acid battery in the ERCOT region, solar lithium battery storage unit in Carmel, IN and a microgrid project at McAlpine Energy Storage System in Charlotte, NC.

 

2:30 – 2:50 P.M.                            Energy Storage Battery Chemistry & Performance

Johan Enslin, Director, Energy Production & Infrastructure Center (EPIC), University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

This session will review the current effectiveness of different battery storage technologies being undertaken at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

 

 

2:50 – 3:00 P.M.                            Concluding Thoughts & Wrap Up

Diane Cherry


REGISTRATION & ESA CONFERENCE INFORMATION: 
The workshop requires registration through the ESA Conference and is a separate fee from the main conference registration price. If you are not attending the conference, please select the FREE expo hall registration, continue with the registration until you are able to select the workshop and then procceed with payment. If you are attending the conference, register as you normally would and select the workshop when prompted. The fee for the workshop is $225 for ESA members and $325 for non-members. NCSEA is a member of ESA therefore members of NCSEA qualify for the member discount. If you have already registered and wish to attend the workshop please email Christy at christy@energync.org for assistance.